Aging out of RTF into the real world – a dangerous proposition

J.D. spent his teenage years growing up in a residential treatment facilities. He celebrated his 18thbirthday by walking out through those doors – free to make his own decisions and live life his way. Within days J.D. was causing a public disturbance. Police were called. They told him to put his hands in the air. He laughed. He mimed a gun with his fingers. The officers open fire. J.D. fell to the ground – dead.


For those of us with kids who have spent years in residential treatment facilities – growing only more dangerous and violent – this story strikes like a death bell in our chest.

You see, my son Devon has been bounced trampoline-style from facility to facility since he was 10. He’s been in these facilities because he cannot live safely at home. He poses a threat to himself and to his younger siblings. However, instead of getting better in these therapeutic settings, his behavior has become worse. 

Because of the polices of these facilities, Devon has committed assaults and serious vandalism with no consequences. 

  • He created thousands of dollars of property damage –  no consequence.
  • He made false allegations of abuse – no consequence
  • He broke a woman’s thumb – no consequence.
  • He stabbed a kid in the back with a pencil – no consequence.
  • He punched a girl in the back of the head – no consequence.

Unfortunately, this is how treatment facilities work. The underlying idea is if you consequence kids, that’s all you’ll ever do and they won’t be able to receive therapy. This is true, but on the flip side, what if the “therapy” the kid is receiving in leu of consequences does not help? What have they learned?

My son will turn 18 in a handful of months. He’s itching to leave and at one-minute past midnight he’ll bolt. He won’t have a high school diploma or have any job skills. Worse, he won’t understand that there are consequences in the real world. He’s come to believe that = with a bit of fast talking – he can turn any situation into a ‘therapeutic incident’ and deflect consequences. 

I’m sure that’s what J.D. thought too – before he was shot and killed by police. He expected them to beg him to calm down, offer him coping skills – and at worse drop him to the ground in a physical restraint. I have no doubt that he did not understand the danger of his behavior.

For the safety of our kids, who will someday age-out of residential treatment and into the real world – we must find a balance. I don’t pretend to know the answer and there are no quick and easy solutions to this problem. Here’s what I do know: Our kids must have effective treatment AND understand that their choices have consequences. 

My kids’ pediatrician told me this story. He personally knew this young man and the incident happened several years ago. 

Let's connect!