• For teachers of children experiencing the effects of early trauma If you are a classroom teacher you almost certainly have students who have experienced childhood trauma. A recent national survey on children’s health found that 47% of all children in the United States have had at least one adverse childhood experience (footnote below). For some, the unfortunate result is reactive attachment disorder (RAD), a serious ...
  • When you feel like you’re on the verge of a nervous breakdown… Unless you’ve lived through a child’s relentless screaming, violent outbursts, physical aggression, and extreme manipulation – hour-after-hour, day-after-day – it may be hard to fathom the long term impact on caregivers. But, the truth is, it can feel like you’re on the verge of a nervous breakdown. Does that seem a bit melodramatic? Before you scoff, consider ...
  • When suicidal ideations may not be serious I opened the closet door to find my son Devon squatting in the shadowy darkness with a belt looped loosely around his neck. He was 9. Confident that he wasn’t actually trying to hurt himself, and was only trying to get attention, I hid my fear. I knew if I showed my alarm, he’d be ...
  • How to love a child who doesn’t love you back By Lynn K. Sollitto, brave mom, author and RAD advocacy hero I instantly fell in love with my biological son when he was born. It was primitive and instinctual. I would have done anything for him. I also fell in love with my adopted daughter Paige right away when I looked down at the small bundle sucking ...
  • Out Of Options, Parents Of Children With Mental Illness Trade Custody For Treatment Illinois Newsroom–Jul 31, 2018 When Toni and Jim Hoy adopted their son Daniel as a toddler, they did not plan to give him back to the state of Illinois 10 years later. “Danny was this cute, lovable little blonde-haired, blue-eyed baby,” Jim said. There were times Daniel would reach over, put his hands on Toni’s face and ...
  • What Social Workers Need to Know When Working with Adoptive Families By brave adoptive parent and advocate Pernell Meier Social workers have been an ever-present part of my family. Over the course of 13 years, we have parented 7 children from foster care, 5 of whom we adopted. In that time, we have had countless social workers in and out of our lives. Some have been rock-stars and ...
  • Parenting a challenging child? Here’s how to increase your resilience Do you ever roll out of bed already over it? At your limit before the day starts? Knowing you can’t take even one more surly look, one more rude comment, one more call from school, one more violent outburst? I’ve been there too. As parents of children with reactive attachment disorder (RAD), life can be so ...
  • How kids in “typical” biological families grow up with attachment issues Adults who grew up in so-called “typical” families—the families we pay no or little attention to because it looks “normal”, okay, or good-enough—can struggle too. In this post from IACD Robert W. McBride, LCSW, MSW offers insight into the experiences that may cause attachment issues in children who are not foster kids and not adopted. Phil the ...
  • The Boy Who Cried Abuse Devon was a boy who cried wolf. On several occasions, he claimed workers had purposely hurt him. When he mumbled about Mr. Myron beating him up. My stomach churned not knowing what was true, what was exaggeration, and what was an outright lie. It was hard to imagine a worker beating Devon, but not hard at ...
  • What it’s like being the sibling of a child with RAD “It’s like living in a prison. We can’t go anywhere. All doors are locked. Alarms everywhere. We can’t have friends over. Stuff goes missing. We’ve all had black eyes, split lips and bite marks…we’re the ones who suffer.” – Grace, 14, on living with a sibling with RAD Grace’s experience is not uncommon for siblings of children ...

 

 

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